186/1 Loi Kroh Rd
Chiang Mai
Thailand
Downunder Pub
Chiang Mai's Premier Australian Sports Venue

MotoGP

 

The Downunder pub strives to give you the best MotoGP viewing experience , big screens, good sound and no music during the race.

Click here for this weeks line up

Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix is the premier championship of motorcycle road racing. It is currently divided into three classes: MotoGP, Moto2 and Moto3. All three classes use four-stroke engines. In 2010, 250 cc two-strokes were replaced by the new Moto2 600 cc four-stroke class. In 2012, 125 cc two-strokes were replaced by the Moto3 250 cc four-stroke class with a weight limit of 65 kg with fuel, and the engine capacity for MotoGP increased from 800 cc to 1,000 cc.

Grand Prix motorcycles are purpose-built racing machines that are neither available for purchase by the general public nor can be ridden legally on public roads. This contrasts with the various production-based categories of racing, such as the Superbike World Championship, that feature modified versions of road-going motorcycles available to the public.

MotoGP has changed dramatically in recent years. From the mid-1970s through 2001, the top class of GP racing allowed 500 cc with a maximum of four cylinders, regardless of whether the engine was a two-stroke or four-stroke. Consequently, all machines were two-strokes, due to the greater power output for a given engine capacity. Some two- and three-cylinder two-stroke 500s were seen, but though they had a minimum-weight advantage under the rules, typically attained higher corner speed and could qualify well, they lacked the power of the four-cylinder machines. In 2002, rule changes were introduced to facilitate the phasing out of the two strokes. The rules permitted manufacturers to choose between running two-strokes engines (500 cc or less) or four-strokes (990cc or less). Manufacturers were also permitted to employ their choice of engine configuration. Despite the significantly increased costs involved in running the new four-stroke machinery, given their extra 490cc capacity advantage, the four-strokes were soon able to dominate their two-stroke rivals. As a result, by 2003 no two-stroke machines remained in the MotoGP field. The 125 cc and 250 cc classes still consist exclusively of two-stroke machines. In 2007, the MotoGP class had its maximum engine displacement capacity reduced to 800 cc for a minimum of 5 years. Since the 2012 season the capacity has increased again to 1,000 cc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please transfer 18,500 payment to 
Account Name: Tantawan Asia Service Company Limited  
Account Number: 172-092083-2 
Bangkok Bank Sukhumvit Soi 43 Branch, Bangkok, Thailand Kindly fax transfer confirmation to 02 6626436. We will arrange delivery accordingly.

Regards,

Peerada


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